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Increase Cervical Mucus to Get Pregnant

Increase Cervical Mucus to Get Pregnant

It is common for a woman to experience some vaginal dryness throughout her childbearing years, but if this continues it may be a sign of a hormone imbalance, an infection, and can make it difficult to get pregnant. Who knew that getting “wet” down there was not only important to the comfort and ease of enjoying intercourse, but for making a baby as well. The cervical mucus a woman produces actually helps in conception efforts. Here’s how…

What is Cervical Mucus and Why is it Important?

The cervix produces mucus that varies in consistency and amount depending on where a woman is at in her menstrual cycle. Just after menstruation, when the estrogen levels are low, the cervix produces a fluid that is thick and acidic which is designed to prevent sperm from entering the vagina. This is known as infertile mucus.

Fertile cervical mucus (CM), also known as cervical fluid (CF) is produced by your cervix as ovulation approaches and depends on a good supply of estrogen from the ovary. Cervical mucus is necessary for allowing the sperm to swim freely through the cervix. You can see it come from the vagina, or as wetness on your underwear or feel it inside of the vagina. Changes in CM can be charted and may be used to detect your most fertile time. When a woman is about to ovulate there should be an increase in thin cervical mucus, as well as a change in the mucus texture, from “wet” to a more pliable, stretchy, egg white like mucus. This is possible through an increase in both water and electrolyte content, and a reduction in acidity. This higher electrolyte content can be seen with an ovulation microscope as a ferning pattern. Healthy fertile cervical mucus nourishes the sperm, protects them from the natural acidity of the vagina, and guides them toward the ovum.

Charting cervical mucus changes is known as the Ovulation Method. In a comparative study of 15 different methods of fertility charting, including the most common methods used to determine ovulation signs, cervical mucus charting alone proved to be the most accurate way to detect a woman’s most fertile time. There is also a product known as Ovatel that is a portable hand-held microscope that you can use to see the ‘ferning’ pattern.

Low to No Cervical Mucus

You may have noticed that you have vaginal dryness at times, but if this is becoming a regular occurrence, it may be a sign something is not functioning properly. If you have continual vaginal dryness and cannot detect cervical mucus at all, you may need to support your body in producing cervical mucus once again.

For women that have low, thick or no cervical fluid, it is harder for the sperm to reach the vagina and beyond for conception. In some cases there may not be a friendly environment for the sperm to sustain themselves. A woman may have developed antisperm antibodies, have some type of infection (yeast or bacterial infection, STD), or may eat a diet high in acidic foods which may cause Cervical Hostility.

Causes of Low Cervical Mucus

  • Not enough water intake each day.
  • Cervicitis or inflammation or infection of the cervix
  • Poor circulation to the reproductive organs; sedentary lifestyle.
  • Hormonal imbalance may cause changes to the entire menstrual cycle, which may inhibit production of fertile cervical mucus. Both high progesterone and low estrogen levels may cause poor cervical mucus quality. Conditions such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is the result of excess hormones from the ovary that can thicken or thin the mucus at odd times.
  • Fertility medications containing hormones can alter fertile cervical mucus production.
  • Cervical polyp or fibroid (very rare).
  • Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) and cryosurgery to treat cervical dysplasia or HPV. These procedures can in some cases cause cervical scar tissue damage which may close off the ducts that secrete the cervical mucus. This is very rare.

Note: None of the natural options below will be helpful for those with cervical scar tissue damage. Scar tissue damage from LEEP or cryosurgery or polyp damage need to be discussed with your ob/gyn.

Natural Options for Increasing Cervical Mucus

1. Hydrate

Drink a lot of water throughout the day. This may be all you need, drink more water. Cervical mucus is made up of 90% water, so if you are not hydrating your body your cervical mucus production may lessen. Regardless if you use any of the supplements, you must drink enough water for your body to be able to make cervical mucus. Drink at least 8 full glasses of clean filtered water a day.

2. Nutritional Supplementation

Be sure you are getting enough essential fatty acids each day in your diet. If you cannot get these through the foods you are eating, you may want to consider taking a complete omega supplement which contains omega 3, 6 and 9.

Essential fatty acids help to:

  • Regulate hormones
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Increase the blood flow to the uterus
  • Reduce sensitivity to the hormone prolactin, which can suppress ovulation
  • Increases egg white cervical mucus, which is needed to help the sperm reach the egg
  • Helps your cycle to become normalized

All of these key areas are vital to healthy, adequate cervical mucus production.

Evening Primrose Oil (EPO) has been used by herbalists for hundreds of years to increase cervical mucus. Evening Primrose Oil is high in omega 6. This plant oil has been shown to increase cervical mucus production while also aiding in hormonal balance.

Borage seed oil is also high in omega-6 essential fatty acids. It has been shown to increase cervical mucus, balance hormones and is similar to evening primrose oil.

L-Arginine is an essential amino acid. Supplementation of L-Arginine helps to promote cervical mucus by supporting the production of nitric oxide (NO). Nitric oxide dilates blood vessels and helps to increase blood flow to the uterus, ovaries, and genitals. Proper circulation to the reproductive organs is vital to the production of cervical mucus.

Both Evening Primrose oil and L-arginine are found in the Fertilica™ Fertile CM Pack. Click here to learn more.

3. Herbs that support healthy cervical mucus production

Herbs that are demulcent and bitter are supportive of mucus gland production function. Some herbs are known to increase circulation to the genitals, while others support hormonal balance which may also be helpful.

    Shatavari root (Asparagus racemosus): This herb is a demulcent. Herbs that have a demulcent action contain mucilage. Mucilage lines the mucus membranes and acts as a protector and tonic for those membranes. Shatavari contains mucilage, this may be helpful for women with low cervical mucus.
    Dandelion leaf and root (Taraxacum officinale): Bitter herb, stimulating to mucus secretion. Nutritive, supports liver health for hormonal balance.
    Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra): Demulcent, promotes healthy mucus membrane secretions. Encourages hormonal balance by supporting the endocrine system.
    Marshmallow root (Althea officinalis): Demulcent and soothing to mucus membranes, supports natural health for proper function of mucus production.
    Red Clover aerial parts, blossom (Trifolium pratense): Red Clover has been shown to increase cervical mucus, aiding vaginal dryness. Increases circulation to the reproductive organs.

Making some of these herbs into a tea will also help to support daily hydration!

4. Use a sperm friendly lubricant prior to intercourse

Did you know that most lubricants can actually harm sperm? Luckily there are some natural options that have been shown not to harm sperm. These products supply lubrication when cervical mucus is lacking. Using a sperm friendly lubricant may help the sperm to reach their destination, which is past your cervix!

Emerita Natural Lubrication is a natural lubricant that is water-based. This product is free of petroleum, latex, and mineral oil, all of which have been shown to irritate vaginal tissue and harm sperm.

Summary

The production of healthy cervical mucus is vital for conception, as it supports the sperm in reaching the ova. Without fertile (thin, but stretchy) cervical mucus this cannot happen as easily. Cervical mucus is also a wonderful tool for detecting a woman’s peak fertile time. There are many natural options for supporting healthy cervical mucus production…

1. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of clean water each day!

2. Consider important nutritional supplements that support cervical mucus production including omega essential fatty acids, L-Arginine and Evening Primrose Oil.

3. Many herbs can support the health of our mucus glands, including how they function. Many of those same herbs also support hormonal balance, which is necessary for appropriate cervical fluid changes.

4. In the meantime, while you are working on the other 3 steps, consider using a natural lubricant to support the sperm in reaching the ova!

Too learn more about related subjects covered in this article, please visit the following links:

Cervical Hostility and Regaining Fertility to Get Pregnant

Shatavari: Fertility Herb from India

Emerita Natural Lubrication

References

  • Erik Odeblad. (1968) The Functional Structure of Human Cervical Mucus. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, Volume 47, Issue S1. Retrieved from: https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00016346809156845
  • D. F. Katz, R. N. Mills and T. R. Pritchett. The movement of human spermatozoa in cervical mucus. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility (1978) Vol 53 259-265
  • George I. Gorodeski. (2000). NO increases permeability of cultured human cervical epithelia by cGMP-mediated increase in G-actin. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 278: C942-C952
  • Lesson 2: Charting Essentials, FertilityFriend.com, 2011
  • Northrup, Christiane, M.D. (2010) Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom. New York, NY: Bantam Books
  • Romm, A., Clare, B. (2010). Botanical Medicine for Women’s Health St. Louis, Missouri: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Hethir Rodriguez - Certified Herbalist, Nutritionist, Birth Doula

Hethir Rodriguez is the Founder and President of Natural Fertility Info.com. She has been a Certified Herbalist for over 19 years, holds a Bachelors degree (BS) in Nutrition Sciences and is a Certified Birth Doula and Massage Therapist specializing in fertility massage. Since founding Natural Fertility Info.com in 2007, Hethir’s research, articles, and guides have been read by over 40,000,000 people, currently averaging at over 1,000,000+ readers per month.  Hethir has dedicated her life to helping provide a source for high quality, research based information and support for those on their journey to becoming parents.

Dr. Kimberly Langdon Cull M.D., OB/GYN
Dr. Kimberly Langdon Cull M.D., OB/GYN

Dr. Kimberly Langdon Cull is a University-trained Obstetrician/Gynecologist with 19-years of clinical experience. She delivered over 2000 babies and specializes in gynecologic diseases such as menstrual disorders, infertility diagnosis and treatment especially pertaining to tubal blockage and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Dr. Langdon is the inventor of 6 patent pending medical devices, and attended Ohio State University from 1987-1995 receiving her Medical Doctorate Degree (M.D.) with Honors in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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[-] 177 Comments
  1. I was hopeful when I saw that you recommended a natural lubricant. I have been looking for a safe one. One of the ingredients in the Emerita Natural Lubricant is not safe – Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate. Please check EWG’s database for each ingredient in any product. This ingredient is a formaldehyde releaser! https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/706077/SODIUM_HYDROXYMETHYLGLYCINATE_%28FORMALDEHYDE_RELEASER%29/#.W25Prq2ZORs

    • Dear Vanessa,

      Thank you for sharing your concern! Anyone interested in using Emerita Natural Lubricant should contact Emerita to ask about this ingredient and share their concerns. Anyone allergic to formaldehyde should avoid this lubricant. It is interesting that Emerita Natural Lubricant is not a product reviewed on the EWG Skin Deep Cosmetics Database.

      From what I see there are very few, limited rabbit studies on this ingredient. Sadly, often times these studies administer the ingredient in doses much to large for the animal so the desired outcome is achieved/proven — doses that may have little to no impact on the average human.

      Nonetheless, it’s great for everyone to do research to choose what products are best for their needs!

  2. hi me and my husband been trying for a yrs now and we went to our doctor both of us is ok and we don’t have any problem and I got regular I have 26 days cycle sometimes will go to 28 days already every yrs I will get ewcm every since I drink L-arginine to increase and now on cd 12 I got little watery don’t have ewcm just wcm only and little bit dry and back to watery cm again and every time I drink that my stomach got hurt I think I might stop drinking. I keep drinking my multi vit.,evening primrose and folic acid I need get back my ewcm

    • Hello Kath!

      It seems like L-Arginine may not be right for you. It may be best to stop taking it. Do you know when exactly you ovulate each cycle? This is important when actively trying to conceive.

  3. I see Emerita Natural Lubrication is recommended; how is it different from pre-seed lubricant? Do you also recommend pre-seed? If not, why?

    • Dear Trinity,

      We now Pre-Seed to be fine. Do read through each product’s ingredients labels to see the differences as you choose the best natural lubricant for your needs.

  4. nice post
    thanx share this post…

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