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3 Things Women With Endometriosis Should Be Doing Daily

3 Things Women With Endometriosis Should Be Doing Daily

The impact of endometriosis infertility is great. The symptoms and ways in which each woman experiences endometriosis vary, but sadly many have some degree of pain – during menstruation and sex, even in between periods – month after month, exacerbated PMS, irregular cycles, heavy bleeding, even issues with other organs of the body where endometrial deposits have attached and grown.

Regardless of the degree of endometriosis symptom(s), there are three things every single woman can and should do daily to help her body fight.

1. Eat Really Well and Boost Immunity!
For women with endometriosis, we know that dietary changes are a must! Many find great relief from troublesome symptoms when they reduce and eliminate dairy, gluten and red meat. So, do give this a try! Beyond that, it is important to also:

  • Eat an anti-inflammatory diet – Turmeric is an incredible anti-inflammatory food-herb and is a must! Zinc is also important (try pumpkin seeds)!
  • Include foods high in antioxidants – Antioxidants are important because they protect the cells from damaging free-radicals restoring and protecting cellular health and DNA.
  • Take a whole food multivitamin – Supporting the body nutritionally as it adjusts to diet changes is key. A multivitamin helps with that.
  • Include Bee Propolis – Bee propolis is immune boosting and anti-inflammatory, which may reduce endometriosis pain; scar tissue and adhesion formation is thought to be triggered by an exaggerated inflammatory response.

Learn more:
Beyond the Endo Diet: Understanding Food Intolerances and Individualized Plans
5 Anti-Inflammatory Foods Women Should Be Eating
Immune Infertility: Natural Options for Immunological Fertility Issues

2. Help the Body Metabolize Estrogen.
Excess estrogen is likely a culprit in: hormonal imbalance, endometrial deposits that grow outside of the uterus and bleed, weight gain that is hard to lose, and exacerbated PMS; it is also known to feed some cancers. Yet, women need estrogen. Healthy levels of estrogen are necessary for healthy bone density, menstrual cycles and ovulation, etc. What is key is to help the body properly produce estrogen and keep estrogen receptor sites from being inundated with excess, harmful xenoestrogens. Here are ways to do that:

  • Cleanse and continue liver support- Cleansing aids the liver in properly detoxifying excess estrogens. After cleansing, liver support can and should continue. The body’s ability to remove excess toxins and waste products in women with endometriosis depends on healthy liver function every day.
  • Learn about these liver-loving herbs – Milk Thistle Seed (Silybum marianum), Dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale), Burdock root (Arctium lappa), Nettle leaf (Urtica dioica)
  • Eat fiber daily – Fiber from whole grains, beans, legumes, and dark green leafy vegetables absorbs excess bile and promotes regular elimination, including the elimination of excess hormones.
  • Try DIM – DIM (diindolylmethane) assists the body with the healthy breakdown and synthesis of excess estrogen.

Learn more:
Prepare for Conception with a Fertility Cleanse…
Why Liver Health is Important to Your Fertility
You Can Reduce Excess Estrogen with Supplement DIM

3. Encourage Healthy Circulation to the Uterus!
With endometriosis, it is important to work to maintain adequate circulation to the uterus. Nutrient- and oxygen-rich blood is crucial for optimal uterine function, uterine lining health, and uterine lining cell proliferation. Healthy blood makes its way to and through the uterus via a healthy circulatory system. My top 3 very easy ways to increase circulation to the uterus are:

  • Self Fertility MassageTM & Castor Oil Packs
  • Fertility Yoga & Exercise
  • Hydration/ Staying hydrated

Learn more:
Endometriosis: Increase Circulation to Your Uterus
How to Use Self Fertility MassageTM to Boost Your Chances of Conception

Trust You Can Heal!
In spite of all the theories of what causes and contributes to endometriosis, there are so many things that are very helpful to overall health, certainly to uterine health and hormonal balance as shared here. They are all very easy to use/follow, safe, and allow you to connect with your body on an intimate level.

I know I shared several links to learn more, yet I have one more to share. If you are interested in learning about endometrium health products click here…

References

  • Barton-Schuster, D. (n.d.). How to Use Fertility Herbs To Enhance Your Fertility Naturally; Endometriosis. Retrieved from: http://natural-fertility-info.com/fertility-herbs#endometriosis
  • Period book by Lara Briden, L. (January 2015). The Period Repair Manual; Natural Treatment for Better Hormones and Better Periods. Charleston, S.C., (pp. 189-193).
  • Rodriguez, H. (n.d.). Zinc: How Essential Is It to Your Fertility?. Retrieved from: http://natural-fertility-info.com/zinc-fertility.html

Elizabeth Willett - M.A., Certified Herbalist

Elizabeth Willett is the Senior Herbalist and Lead Educator at NaturalFertilityInfo.com. She holds a BS in Mass Communications (2000) from Minnesota State University, and a Master of Arts degree (MA, 2010) in Holistic Health Studies with a specialization is herbalism from St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN. Liz has written over 200 articles on women’s fertility and brings a vast wealth of knowledge and expertise in holistic health and healing to Natural Fertility Info.com

Dr. Christine Traxler M.D., OB/GYN
Dr. Christine Traxler M.D., OB/GYN

Dr. Traxler is a University-trained obstetrician/gynecologist, working with patients in Minnesota for over 20 years. She is a professional medical writer; having authored multiple books on pregnancy and childbirth; textbooks and coursework for medical students and other healthcare providers; and has written over 1000 articles on medical, health, and wellness topics.  Dr. Traxler attended the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences and University of Minnesota Medical School,  earning a degree in biochemistry with summa cum laude honors in 1981,  and receiving her Medical Doctorate degree (MD) in 1986.

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